Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Zeigler House Inn Is Among the Hot Spots for Prohibition Era, Roaring 20s Time Travel in Savannah, Georgia USA

Savannah picnic in Laurel Grove Cemetery shows time travel and Roaring 20s Flapper fashion
Dolled-up in Flapper fashion,
Savannah tourism stars Jackie
Heinz (right) and dear friend Diane Crews
picnic in Laurel Grove Cemetery.
SAVANNAH, Georgia -- The Zeigler House Inn is a storied mansion on West Jones Street. The popular mansion bed and breakfast is at the heart of the "dry crusaders",  American Temperance Society neighborhoods, and Roaring Twenties' Prohibition-era escapades.

Liquor was not a new subject of contention for Georgia in the early 1900s. From the inception of Britain's last colony in North America (1733), liquor (rum, whisky, brandy) was banned in Georgia. Madeira wine and beer, however, were beverages carried on board the Atlantic Ocean crossing on the first settlers' ship, The Ann.

ZEIGLER HOUSE INN: PROHIBITION ERA SAVANNAH

Innkeeper Jackie Heinz shares one character-rich story of a proper, bow-tied gentlemen whom she noticed walking slowly and often passed Zeigler House Inn.

A soft spoken gentleman -- perhaps wearing the quintessential seersucker suit -- called from the sidewalk for Jackie's attention one day, offering to share his tale of the stately mansion's "Cat House" era. Interestingly, a ceramic cat had been placed in a front window of the then-brothel / bordello. The position of the cat denoted whether it was safe to enter or if police were in the house ... as patrons, collecting fees, or raiding. The ceramic cat was used much like the "red light" in Europe's bordello-haus, which turned the red light on during working hours.
A ceramic cat from the Prohibition era can be seen at Ships of the Sea Museum. Two world travelers photographed the cat in their For 91-days in Savannah blog.