Saturday, May 14, 2016

For Memorial Day Weekend and July 4th Holiday, Try New Things in Savannah GA USA: Zeigler House Inn Points to French Connections.

SAVANNAH, Georgia -- Jackie Heinz at Zeigler House Inn is a Savannah tourism star, known for going the extra mile, sharing little extras with her bed and breakfast guests. Today we thought we'd share a few French connections and Savannah tidbits to celebrate Memorial Day Weekend, July 4th holiday, and American patriotism any time!

Savannah lodging star Jackie Heinz on Jones Street near Zeigler House Inn | Photo (c) Sandy Traub
Celebrating in red, white, and blue enthusiasm on
world famous Jones Street, here innkeeper
Jackie Heinz shows American patriotism
along with the Savannah historic district's
gardens and architecture.
In patriotic Savannah, Georgia, we hear often of General Marquis de Lafayette, an American Revolutionary War hero. There are more Frenchmen at the heart of the successful American Revolution. Their names were Anglicanized.

In our corner of this brave, multi-cultural USA nation, courage, ingenuity, enterprise, public spirit, and honor prevail. 

Savannah, Georgia's cultures and heritages overflow in our international city founded by the British in 1732. Beginning with early colonization, America's 13th colony, Georgia welcomed multi-cultural settlers, bringing with them heritages from around the world -- English, Portuguese, French, German, Austrian, Irish, Scottish, French Haitians (the city's first Catholics), Greeks, more Europeans and Africans.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC POINTS TO SAVANNAH'S FOOD, A MELDING POT OF CULTURES

"The cooking of the southern United States evolved from French, German, Native Americans, and African-American cultures..." The book's article points to Zeigler House Inn's neighborhood on Jones Street, Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room, and to Sweet Potatoes restaurant. -- Source: Savannah Georgia: Southern Feasts. Where the Locals Go: More Than 300 Places Around the World to Eat, Play by National Geographic.
In Savannah, the aroma of pralines will pull River Street visitors into River Street Sweets and Savannah Candy Kitchen. Free tastes are offered! 

Widely accepted stories include that pralines are named after French diplomat from the early 17th century whose name and title was César, duc de Choiseul, comte du Plessis-Praslin. His personal chef, Clement Lassagne, is believed to be the creator. 
FRENCH HERITAGE: July 4th Connections 
During the year's leading up to the American Revolutionary War, Tondee's Tavern stood on the northwest corner of Broughton Street and Whitaker Street. Tondee's Tavern was the gathering place for Savannah's "Sons of Liberty", American patriots, wanting freedom from England's rule.

Who knew that Peter Tondee was born Peter Tondu, one of two sons born to Jeanne and Pierre Tondu. Peter Tondee, Jr. grew up among many youths who were to become men of affairs in the critical period which changed the course of world history. His father, Pierre was born in Chatillon-sur-Loire in north-central France's Loire valley (1684). It is an area known for winegrowers houses. "Peirre paid passage for himself and his two sons, age ten and five, to come to America, boarding the James at Rotherhithe docks [on the Thames River in east London] on January 24, 1733. They arrived in Savannah, Ga. in February, after the first Colonist[s] on the Ann. Sometime between leaving France and coming to Savannah, Pierre Tondu changed his name to Peter Tondee, Sr. Shortly after arriving in Savannah, Peter, Sr. died leaving his two sons orphans...." -- Source: Schley County Georgia Bios Tondee Family. File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by Linda Snow Davis.

BUNKER HILL HAS FRENCH CONNECTIONS, TOO.

George Bunker, 1632, is the son of William Bon Coeur, a French Huguenot, for whom Bunker Hill was named. -- Source: Colonial Families of the United States of America, Volume 6 edited by George Norbury Mackenzie.

On June 17, 1775, early in the Revolutionary War (1775-83), the British defeated the Americans at the Battle of Bunker Hill in Massachusetts. Despite their loss, the inexperienced colonial forces inflicted significant casualties against the enemy, and the battle provided them with an important confidence boost.

One Savannah square has a Bunker Hill link. 

British gunpowder seized by Savannahians had been sent to aid the Americans at Bunker Hill, during the American Revolutionary War. Savannah's own Warren Square was laid out in 1791 and named for General Joseph Warren, a Revolutionary War hero killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill and who had served as President of the Provincial Government of Massachusetts. The ‘’sister city’’ relationship between Savannah and Boston survived even the Civil War, and Bostonians sent shiploads of provisions to Savannah shortly after the city surrendered to General Sherman in 1864. Warren Square is on Habersham, between Bryan and Congress Streets. Source: Wikipedia: Squares of Savannah

French Country Suite, one of seven apartment
size accommodations with private bath
and kitchen or mini kitchen, at Zeigler House Inn
in Savannah's National Landmark Historic District.
ZEIGLER HOUSE INN FEATURES FRENCH DECOR! 

It's that time to escape! Zeigler House Inn will help you to keep it elegantly simple, authentic, and interesting! Get away for Memorial Day Weekend, or for Independence Day fireworks or July 4th sales!

Get "refreshed by the living history -- preserved in that most European of foundations, the city -- that [Bernard-Henri Lévy] finds in Savannah, Ga." -- Source: American Vertigo: Traveling America in the Footsteps of Tocqueville By Bernard-Henri Lévy.


Check our blog's event calendar for more holiday happenings in Savannah! Zeigler House Inn's Jackie Heinz will share more unique things to do in Savannah -- one of the hallmark's of unique, true southern hospitality and southern ways in Savannah, Georgia USA. Come visit soon and often!

P.S. If you're in Savannah for Veteran's Day, Friday November 11, 2016, we'll help you find rutabagas, also known as French Turnips, table turnips or swedes.

More Insights On French Savannah from Zeigler House Inn:

- French in Savannah: Zeigler House Inn, Too!

- In Historic Savannah GA: Storybook Holidays with Zeigler House Inn's Southern Gentlefolks 

ABOUT ZEIGLER HOUSE INN

Built in 1856 for Solomon Zeigler -- a prosperous lumber merchant, prominent Savannah citizen and Salzburger* descendant -- the Italianate home is now an historic Savannah bed and breakfast inn located in the heart of Savannah's National Landmark Historic District.

Original house features include beautiful heart of pine wood floors of the era, elegant ceiling medallions, 11 slate and wood fireplaces, and a dramatic heart of pine staircase embellished with a mahogany and walnut handrail.

Featured on "Wheel of Fortune", Zeigler House Inn was fully renovated in 2002. This romantic getaway inn on magnificent Jones Street affords stately Savannah bed and breakfast lodging with delicious cuisine (compliments of caterer-turned-innkeeper Jackie Heinz, a southern 'steel magnolia' from Kentucky). With French-inspired decor -- a nod to Revolutionary hero, General Marquis de Lafayette -- , the 7 private suites and room afford Europe-meets-Savannah style comforts for a leisure trip and business travel. Each of private suites and rooms uniquely features a private kitchen or kitchenette, plus private bath.

* The first Salzburgers landed in Savannah, Georgia after a two months trip across the Atlantic Ocean to escape religious persecution in their native country of Salzburg, presently known as Austria. The industrious settlers built their religious Lutheran community in Ebenezer along the Savannah River near today's Rincon, Georgia.

Copyright © 2016 Zeigler House Inn  

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