Saturday, March 28, 2015

Zeigler House Inn: Your Prominent Place to Stay in Savannah for Ease and Elegance

SAVANNAH Georgia -- Ease and elegance are Savannah traditions that continue in the "prominent and lively landmarks", including at Zeigler House Inn on beautiful Jones Street in downtown Savannah.

Historic homes on Jones Street top 10 pretty street in America
Innkeeper Jackie Heinz celebrates Savannah's patriotic
spirit, honoring America's Independent Day on July 4th,
walking along on Jones Street near Zeigler House Inn,
a small, private city hotel in downtown Savannah,
Georgia's National Landmark Historic District.
For this Savannah historic inn -- set in its prominent, top-pick downtown neighborhood along brick-paved Jones Street amid the gentlefolks -- the ambiance is one of peaceful, quiet lodging.

Here ease and elegance are paired with engaging, entertaining happenings and interesting visitors -- opera and Savannah Philharmonic music guests, European and southern heritage, downtown running marathon routes along Barnard Street, southern cuisine that wows here and steps away at Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room, and a southern USA-style patriotic spirit.
"Like the consummate Southern belle, Jones Street in Savannah, Ga., appears in every regional and national beauty contest, and often wins." -- 10Best: Prettiest Southern Streets for a Stroll, USA Today, November 2014  
Historic Savannah Lodging Places Are Part of the Historic District's Ease and Elegance  

As we read in Malcolm Bell, Jr.'s heritage-rich narrative, "Ease and Elegance, Madeira and Murder: The Social Life of Savannah's City Hotel", we welcome his Savannah stories. Of course, we would like to sidestep his tale of the honor dueling, yet we won't try to re-write Savannah history here. 
Modern day Savannah places and traditions? Annually in February, the Davenport House Museum (circa 1821) features "Potable Gold:Savannah's Madeira Tradition". 
Under construction in 1819-1821 on the south side of Bay Street between Bull and Whitaker Streets, Eleaser and Jane Early built the City Hotel, "one of antebellum Savannah's most prominent and lively landmarks."  Source: The Georgia Historical Quarterly, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall 1992), pp. 551-576, Published by: Georgia Historical Society
Modern day Savannah places and traditions? City Hotel's modern address is 19-21 West Bay Street, now Moon River Brewing Company. "City Hotel’s final guest checked out in 1864, just before the arrival of General Tecumseh Sherman during the Civil War and the subsequent closing of the City Hotel." Source: MoonRiverBrewing.com | The 4-story white building is seen in this famous Joseph Louis Fermin Cerveau painting from 1837. 
IN 21st CENTURY SAVANNAH REMAINS "SHOWY', LIKENED TO "AN ENGLISH VILLAGE".

top ten pretty streets in America Jones Street in Savannah GA
One of the prettiest strolls in America,
Jones Street -- our house inn's beautiful
avenue -- here with Savannah azaleas
in March 2015
One 19th century City Hotel guest, Captain Basil Hall, called Savannah "showy".  The captain's wife, Margaret Hunter Hall likened Savannah to "an English village with its grassy walks and rows of trees on both sides of the street." The City Hotel also entertained dignitaries, including the Marque de Lafayette during his post-Revolutionary War visit to Savannah (March 1825).

On a more intimate scale, Zeigler House Inn stands socially and prominently lively and ready to host Savannah tourism guests. City Hotel, decorated in evergreens, served also as a gathering place for St. Patrick's Day dining and Fourth of July celebrations where the "towering Liberty Pole" was raised, and entertained celebrities.

Privacy dictates that Zeigler House Inn withhold all but a few pre-approved names of celebrity guests

However, we learn from Mr. Bell's historical account in 1832 world-famous naturalist John James Audubon made contact with William Gaston of Savannah, who agreed to serve as Audubon's local agent for "Birds of America" volumes.
Modern day Savannah places? Gaston Street in the historic district is named to honor William Gaston. Check with E. Shaver Booksellers on Madison for a copy of Birds of America
In 1833, City Hotel prepared foods to entertain for the second inauguration celebration at City Hall for U.S. President Andrew Jackson, and "a hotel-sponsored dinner honoring John Macpherson Berrien, Attorney General of the United States."
Modern day Savannah places? In downtown Savannah, on East Broughton Street, the home of Attorney General Berrien is currently under extensive renovation by a family member who recently purchased the property.
Yes, Savannah historic places are still the in places for ease and elegance in the Savannah historic district. We hope you will plan your next stay with us at Zeigler House Inn on the most beautiful residential street in the south, Jones Street. Contact us for your Savannah visit / Savannah bed and breakfast getaway: Phone 912-233-5307 | USA Toll-free 866-233-5307 | Fax 912-233-0220 | 121 WEST Jones Street @ Barnard Street, Savannah, Georgia USA 31401; ZeiglerHouseInn.com; EMAIL innkeeper@zeiglerhouseinn.com

P.S. More Happenings Places from 1819 Savannah
In 1819, Savannah hosted United States Presidents James Monroe, who stayed with William Scarbrough in his new William Jay-designed home on West Broad Street (now Martin Luther King, Jr., Boulevard). President Monroe attended and dedication of Independent Presbyterian Church on Oglethorpe Avenue. And, Scarbrough was able to show the U.S. President his new steam driven sailing ship, the S.S. Savannah. Captained by Moses Rogers, the S. S. Savannah began her maiden voyage from Savannah on May 22, 1819 and arrived in Liverpool, England on June 20. 1819, continuing on to St. Petersburg, Russia, becoming the first steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean.
The Scarbrough mansion is now Ships of the Sea Museum. Maritime Day is May 22 each year.  
Designed also by William Jay, Telfair Museum's Owens-Thomas House was built between 1816 and 1819 for banker and cotton merchant Richard Richardson. The world-famous English Regency mansion is located on Oglethorpe Square.
Copyright 2015 Zeigler House Inn

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